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New photo exhibit highlights the rapidly eroding coastline of the Mississippi river delta

on Tuesday,November 24,2009 21:11

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Hurricane Katrina''s destruction of the city of New Orleans was a heart-wrenching ordeal for the country as a whole, yet the devastation of the Big Easy was only a fraction of the damage done the raging torrent. A recent photo exhibit being hosted by the Port of New Orleans seeks to document some of the untold carnage wrought by the 2005 storm, that which was done to the Mississippi river Delta.

Entitled "The End of the Great River: Photographs of the Lower Mississippi River Delta," the exhibit is a collection of black and white landscapes shot by New Orleans-based photographer Matthew White that documents the continued loss of the sparsely inhabited area to soil erosion and flooding.

The region boasts 3 million acres of wetlands and has contributed a valuable shipping route that runs through the contiguous united states.

"I have captured a rare glimpse of some of the most remote locations on the Louisiana coast", said White. "The way of life that is so simple and peaceful down there on the Delta is just hanging by a thread. I feel that I can do my part for its preservation by showing what is still beautiful about it; that it is, and always has been, one of the most unique and spellbinding landscapes in the nation."

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